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Genetics Explain Why More Men Are Color Blind Than Women

2010-09-30 Print
 

While color blindness commonly affects many individuals all over the world today, different studies show that roughly 8% of all men and 0.5% of all women are colorblind.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE / PRURGENT

While color blindness commonly affects many individuals all over the world today, different studies show that roughly 8% of all men and 0.5% of all women are colorblind.

Supported by various studies and researches, these figures mean that men are about 20 times more likely than women to encounter such visual condition characterized by color deficiency.

This problem, although not life threatening but may pose serious safety concerns if unaddressed, has been traced to hereditary factors particularly the passing on of affected genes from generation to generation.

Studies pointed out that color blindness is caused by a sex-linked trait, where the defective gene is passed on through the X chromosome. Since men have (XY) chromosomes compared to women having both (XX) chromosomes, this explains why men are more likely to have it than women.

It further cited that females are color blind only if both their X chromosomes are defective, whereas men are color deficient if their only X chromosome is found to be color defective.

Although partial color blindness may also be acquired from diseases, another eye disorder, injury, as well as ageing, these causes were noted to be less prevalent than the genetically triggered vision problem.

Color blindness or medically termed as vision deficiency, is characterized by the inability of one person to perceive color differences as most other people do. Also called partial color blindness, this condition exists when a person is missing one of the three types of cones or photoreceptors that provide color sensitivity to the eyes.

The normal color vision is called trichromatic or having the ability to see color as 3-dimmensional, with all three colored cones red, green, and blue working properly.

Meanwhile, a dichromatic means color deficiency with primarily only 2-demensional color space clearly visible, and one of the classes of cones is either missing or working improperly.

To understand more about color blindness and to check if one has it, Color-Blind.org is an informative site that provides a wealth of useful information on color blindness and the best ways to deal with the problem.

 
Contact Info
Jeremy Brownsword
old road
barlaston
stoke on Trent

Phone: 01782378562

Website: http://www.color-blind.org